Senator, a four-year-old racehorse being hoisted back to recovery room of the Singapore Turf Club’s vet hospital after successful arthroscopic surgery. The general anaesthesia takes about 15 minutes to wear off after the surgery and the medical team will monitor the horse via a surveillance camera until it regains consciousness and can be taken back to the stables to rest.

Senator, a four-year-old racehorse being hoisted back to recovery room of the Singapore Turf Club’s vet hospital after successful arthroscopic surgery. The general anaesthesia takes about 15 minutes to wear off after the surgery and the medical team will monitor the horse via a surveillance camera until it regains consciousness and can be taken back to the stables to rest.

 Veterinary surgeon Dan Shaw (middle), 52, and his assistant Toh Wei Xin, 25, performing an arthroscopy on four-year-old racehorse Senator, as veterinary surgeon and anaesthetist Kieran Finn, 45, monitors the animal’s heart rate. The STC’s vet hospital performs an average of four operations a week.

Veterinary surgeon Dan Shaw (middle), 52, and his assistant Toh Wei Xin, 25, performing an arthroscopy on four-year-old racehorse Senator, as veterinary surgeon and anaesthetist Kieran Finn, 45, monitors the animal’s heart rate. The STC’s vet hospital performs an average of four operations a week.

 Veterinary surgeon Aileen Sandosham, 42, performing maintenance acupuncture on eight-year-old racehorse Golden Curl to treat its sore muscles. Acupuncture is used for a variety of conditions, from muscular issues to wound healing, and is a beneficial form of natural treatment.

Veterinary surgeon Aileen Sandosham, 42, performing maintenance acupuncture on eight-year-old racehorse Golden Curl to treat its sore muscles. Acupuncture is used for a variety of conditions, from muscular issues to wound healing, and is a beneficial form of natural treatment.

 Groundsman Amal Baiwash, 27, using a metal hook to remove weeds that have grown in the bottom layer of the soil of the turf grass as track manager Philip Thomas (standing), 50, supervises. This aspect of track maintenance can be tricky as it takes a trained eye to identify the weeds, which have to be removed so that the turf grass has sufficient room to grow.

Groundsman Amal Baiwash, 27, using a metal hook to remove weeds that have grown in the bottom layer of the soil of the turf grass as track manager Philip Thomas (standing), 50, supervises. This aspect of track maintenance can be tricky as it takes a trained eye to identify the weeds, which have to be removed so that the turf grass has sufficient room to grow.

 Mr Sulaiman Saib, 43, a syce, taking three-year-old racehorse Winning Tango for a swim. Syces are responsible for grooming the animals and taking them out for exercise. Racehorses go for swims up to four times a week. Members of the public who sign up for the stable tours can watch this activity, which helps the horses build stamina and strength.

Mr Sulaiman Saib, 43, a syce, taking three-year-old racehorse Winning Tango for a swim. Syces are responsible for grooming the animals and taking them out for exercise. Racehorses go for swims up to four times a week. Members of the public who sign up for the stable tours can watch this activity, which helps the horses build stamina and strength.

 A worker putting the finishing touches to the Emirates Singapore Derby banner, which is shaped like a horseshoe, on Saturday, the day before the race. As live races are held on Fridays and Sundays, Saturdays can get busy as workers have to tear down the decorations for the previous day and put up new ones.

A worker putting the finishing touches to the Emirates Singapore Derby banner, which is shaped like a horseshoe, on Saturday, the day before the race. As live races are held on Fridays and Sundays, Saturdays can get busy as workers have to tear down the decorations for the previous day and put up new ones.

 The Emirates Singapore Derby draws people from all walks of life - from glamorous women in summery frocks and feathered hats to slipper-clad punters clutching their betting guides. Spectators often look at the horses in the parade ring before placing their bets.

The Emirates Singapore Derby draws people from all walks of life - from glamorous women in summery frocks and feathered hats to slipper-clad punters clutching their betting guides. Spectators often look at the horses in the parade ring before placing their bets.

 Punters cheering as jockey Manoel Nunes takes racehorse Infantry to victory across the finishing line at yesterday’s Emirates Singapore Derby. The race, which has been held every year since 1880, is the second-richest Singapore horse race, with a prize money of $1.15 million this year.

Punters cheering as jockey Manoel Nunes takes racehorse Infantry to victory across the finishing line at yesterday’s Emirates Singapore Derby. The race, which has been held every year since 1880, is the second-richest Singapore horse race, with a prize money of $1.15 million this year.

 Senator, a four-year-old racehorse being hoisted back to recovery room of the Singapore Turf Club’s vet hospital after successful arthroscopic surgery. The general anaesthesia takes about 15 minutes to wear off after the surgery and the medical team will monitor the horse via a surveillance camera until it regains consciousness and can be taken back to the stables to rest.
 Veterinary surgeon Dan Shaw (middle), 52, and his assistant Toh Wei Xin, 25, performing an arthroscopy on four-year-old racehorse Senator, as veterinary surgeon and anaesthetist Kieran Finn, 45, monitors the animal’s heart rate. The STC’s vet hospital performs an average of four operations a week.
 Veterinary surgeon Aileen Sandosham, 42, performing maintenance acupuncture on eight-year-old racehorse Golden Curl to treat its sore muscles. Acupuncture is used for a variety of conditions, from muscular issues to wound healing, and is a beneficial form of natural treatment.
 Groundsman Amal Baiwash, 27, using a metal hook to remove weeds that have grown in the bottom layer of the soil of the turf grass as track manager Philip Thomas (standing), 50, supervises. This aspect of track maintenance can be tricky as it takes a trained eye to identify the weeds, which have to be removed so that the turf grass has sufficient room to grow.
 Mr Sulaiman Saib, 43, a syce, taking three-year-old racehorse Winning Tango for a swim. Syces are responsible for grooming the animals and taking them out for exercise. Racehorses go for swims up to four times a week. Members of the public who sign up for the stable tours can watch this activity, which helps the horses build stamina and strength.
 A worker putting the finishing touches to the Emirates Singapore Derby banner, which is shaped like a horseshoe, on Saturday, the day before the race. As live races are held on Fridays and Sundays, Saturdays can get busy as workers have to tear down the decorations for the previous day and put up new ones.
 The Emirates Singapore Derby draws people from all walks of life - from glamorous women in summery frocks and feathered hats to slipper-clad punters clutching their betting guides. Spectators often look at the horses in the parade ring before placing their bets.
 Punters cheering as jockey Manoel Nunes takes racehorse Infantry to victory across the finishing line at yesterday’s Emirates Singapore Derby. The race, which has been held every year since 1880, is the second-richest Singapore horse race, with a prize money of $1.15 million this year.

Senator, a four-year-old racehorse being hoisted back to recovery room of the Singapore Turf Club’s vet hospital after successful arthroscopic surgery. The general anaesthesia takes about 15 minutes to wear off after the surgery and the medical team will monitor the horse via a surveillance camera until it regains consciousness and can be taken back to the stables to rest.

Veterinary surgeon Dan Shaw (middle), 52, and his assistant Toh Wei Xin, 25, performing an arthroscopy on four-year-old racehorse Senator, as veterinary surgeon and anaesthetist Kieran Finn, 45, monitors the animal’s heart rate. The STC’s vet hospital performs an average of four operations a week.

Veterinary surgeon Aileen Sandosham, 42, performing maintenance acupuncture on eight-year-old racehorse Golden Curl to treat its sore muscles. Acupuncture is used for a variety of conditions, from muscular issues to wound healing, and is a beneficial form of natural treatment.

Groundsman Amal Baiwash, 27, using a metal hook to remove weeds that have grown in the bottom layer of the soil of the turf grass as track manager Philip Thomas (standing), 50, supervises. This aspect of track maintenance can be tricky as it takes a trained eye to identify the weeds, which have to be removed so that the turf grass has sufficient room to grow.

Mr Sulaiman Saib, 43, a syce, taking three-year-old racehorse Winning Tango for a swim. Syces are responsible for grooming the animals and taking them out for exercise. Racehorses go for swims up to four times a week. Members of the public who sign up for the stable tours can watch this activity, which helps the horses build stamina and strength.

A worker putting the finishing touches to the Emirates Singapore Derby banner, which is shaped like a horseshoe, on Saturday, the day before the race. As live races are held on Fridays and Sundays, Saturdays can get busy as workers have to tear down the decorations for the previous day and put up new ones.

The Emirates Singapore Derby draws people from all walks of life - from glamorous women in summery frocks and feathered hats to slipper-clad punters clutching their betting guides. Spectators often look at the horses in the parade ring before placing their bets.

Punters cheering as jockey Manoel Nunes takes racehorse Infantry to victory across the finishing line at yesterday’s Emirates Singapore Derby. The race, which has been held every year since 1880, is the second-richest Singapore horse race, with a prize money of $1.15 million this year.

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